GGJ01-127

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Main Page The great Gospel of John Volume 1 GGJ01-127 Chapter


Chapter 127 - The death of Cornelius’ daughter in Capernaum

127,1. But now Judas, whom the wine had heated somewhat unduly, also wants to have his say with his table-neighbors, the disciples of John. But Thomas, his perennial opponent, beats him to it, saying: ‘Friend, when the Master speaks, the disciples must be quiet and listen, but not speak, because words out of our mouth here would be the greatest folly. But should you feel the urge to speak, then step outside and yell to your heart’s content, returning when your mouth gets tired.’

127,2. Says Judas: ‘What do you want of me? I did you no harm. Shall I not get to speaking at all?’

127,3. Says Thomas: ‘We are familiar with your wisdom through and through over the years, and are not at all inclined to, right next to our great Master, listen to it for the thousandth time, and we are all imbued with as much homespun wisdom as yourself. Therefore you can give no greater teaching than we already have and you will hopefully see that it is not necessary for you to talk here. We disciples are to only speak when asked, we can of course ask as well, but then watch it that our question is well founded in need. But if we ask only out of idle curiosity, to give our tongue free reign, then we are worthy of flogging, because mad fools should be always punished with the whip.’

127,4. Says Judas: ‘All right, all right. I'm quiet already, knowing that in your presence I cannot and must not speak, since you are the prophet Elijah’s wisdom. What a pity you did not live before Solomon. What heights of wisdom Solomon could have reached in your school. But now no more, I’m quiet.’

127,5. Thomas would have liked to add more, but I winked to him that it sufficed and he kept quiet.

127,6. But one of John’s disciples still could not get the hang of his colleagues being compared to old, torn garments patched up with new patches, and old wineskins not capable of taking new wine. Therefore he turned to Me with a rather clumsy question, saying: ‘I can see now that you too might be a prophet, but I see that the wine from the old skins suits you better than the new one in the new skins and it seems to Me that your coat is none too new either. Should it need a few patches, then I can help you out, as I have a great many of them. If I can be of assistance there, let me know.’

127,7. His companions felt like throwing him out for such an awkward question. But I took his part, explaining the comparison to him more comprehensibly and it put him at ease.

127,8. But to the others I said: ‘If you see one blind stumbling over a ditch, who through his fall has flattened the high grass around the water-ditch, will you hold him to account, fining him for the damage? See, this your brother like yourselves can see with the eyes of the flesh, but is still quite blind in his soul-eyes and it should be over-rough to punish a brother because he stumbled somewhat in front of us.’

127,9. For these words all sang Me a proper three cheers and ‘hail thee’, saying: ‘That’s proper talk, and anyone who acts in accordance with how He says commendably and wisely is worthy of being called a man among all men. Hail thee and three cheers to you, man of all men.’

127,10. With the sound of these words and a few of My further comments on old garments, the new wine and wine skins having only just died down, one of the chiefs of Capernaum (in fact the Roman Commander Cornelius) comes in hastily, properly storming Me, falling on his knees and saying breathlessly: ‘Lord! Friend! You godly Master and Savior! My most beloved daughter, who bears my name, my glorious, good and most beautiful daughter, has died. Here the chief weeps and for a while is unable to speak. Recovering after a while, he continues:

127,11. Lord, to whom nothing is impossible, come with me to my house and lay Your miraculous hands upon her and she shall surely live again, just like the school superintendent Jairus’ little girl also was fully dead and lived again. I beg you, my most exalted Friend, come and do me this favor.’

127,12. I said: ‘Never fear, I am coming to do according to your request. Although the daughter is indeed fully dead and cold, yet I shall nevertheless awaken her, so that she may then proclaim God’s glory to the poor. And so let us go.’

127,13. But My disciples asked whether to wait for Me here, or whether to also come along. But I said: ‘All those of you who are My disciples and you also, Matthew, who have been a tax collector, follow Me. I have taken care of your earthly house and shall do so in future, but for this you are to become My disciple, like these.’

127,14. Matthew casts off his host’s vestment at once, putting on his good coat, and follows Me without first making the usual host’s arrangements with his own for his absence.

127,15. Nota bene: This is what everyone must do who wants to follow Me. He has to become dead to all worldly living and not think about his worldly state, or he is not fit for My Kingdom. Because he who lays hands on his plough but looks over his shoulder is not fit for the Kingdom of God.’

Main Page The great Gospel of John Volume 1 GGJ01-127 Chapter