GGJ03-72

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Main Page The great Gospel of John Volume 3 GGJ03-72 Chapter


Chapter 72 - On testing the engaged couple.

72,1. Cyrenius says, “You have just mentioned something about natural means; what might that consist of?”

72,2. I say, “Of the natural temperance of life! A hot blood is constantly more destructive in nature than a cool one; thus hot-blooded people are also more gluttonous than the cool-blooded and have an ever-growing desire for much and good-tasting meals and drinks.

72,3. But if such people keep moderation or are kept in moderation, in that one explains to them with a friendly heart why one is doing it for them and recommends moderation and greater leanness of food, the blood will soon pulse cooler and the sensual drive will begin to lose much of its power without the least disadvantage for the rest of the health of the body and the soul.

72,4. But if a very desiring wife even through longer observation of the golden moderation of nature has not received any noticeable reversal, she should take at waning moon in the evening the water of cooked Senna leaves [Senna alexandrina] with some aloe juice, about four tablespoons full, but not every day, just every third or fourth day and it will thus begin to look better for the heated nature of the wife.

72,5. But should this all as well as the observed good teaching bear little or no fruit, then at the demand of the husband the earlier discussed separation procedure from bed and board can be started.

72,6. But in any case the sober wife plagued by the randy man should be listened to ten times more – especially if she finds herself in blessed circumstances – than a man plagued by his randy wife; for a sober man has besides moral means also a number of natural disciplinary means with which he can cool his wife’s heated blood and it will not damage the hot-blooded wife if the man shows a little seriousness from his good will sometimes. Only such a person must never act from a background of grief or anger but always from the background of true love for the neighbor, otherwise he will be of no use for anything and will only cause damage.

72,7. But that is all in all what concerns marriage and the sins in all directions, and the world should be decided accordingly in all places.

72,8. There should be a legal order created by the State that marriages once consecrated should be maintained morally as much as possible, and that people who are afflicted with physical and spiritual illnesses should not be allowed to marry; for out of such marriages a fully blessed fruit can never emerge.

72,9. However, even with those free of affliction a test should be carried to show whether the young bridegroom and the young bride are suitable for one another.

72,10. If an authorized, wise examiner then finds some unpleasant facts, he should hold back the approval of full marriage and discuss the grave consequences vividly with those who want to marry, and point out to them that the valid permission for a full consecration 412of marriage cannot be given as long as the problems remain.

72,11. Also an official registrar should make those eager to get married perfectly clear about the seriousness of a consecrated marriage and the heavenly high purpose of such.

72,12. If it turns out thereby that those who want to marry begin to behave more and more soberly, get rid of their worldly knots so that they want to legally bind themselves only because of mutual human value, only then should such an authorized person issue the permission for a valid marriage. He should enter the oath of faithfulness in a book to show the insolubility of marriage with addition of the year and day of the marriage consecration and should constantly remain in the knowledge of the following marital circumstances – as they develop, whether positive or negative.

72,13. Such wise proxies for the conducting of marriages should therefore not be foreign to a community, but only locals who know the people, whether young or old, as well as they know themselves; thus the many unsuccessful marriages will thereby be prevented and there will be much blessing on such a purified community.

72,14. Thus it would be good to place a matrimonial court in every larger community which would constantly watch over all the affairs of marriage. Of course such a court would have to be of the highest unimpeachable character and at the head there should be a man such as Mathael.

72,15. This man should also observe the marriage conjunctions, so that a young man under twenty four and a maiden of less than twenty should never join in marriage. For this time is at least necessary for the full maturity for a good and in the spirit held marriage. For spouses who are too young spoil themselves through mutual sensual enjoyment, soon become disgusting to one another and the crisis is at hand.

72,16. Therefore all true happiness of marriage should in the future depend on the discussed marital judge; in whichever community a very wise high judge carries out his important duties things will soon be most blessed.

72,17. Such a high judge will then also keep an eye on the upbringing and the good discipline of the children in the community entrusted to him, and hold them in his heart and will know how to prevent all annoyances with the corresponding means; he will know how to punish the rebellious and praise and reward the diligent for all their goodness and truth, in that he will draw their attention to the blessings of their housekeeping.

72,18. But there he should not, as was already the case here and there, set certain awards because such external motives are not at all suitable for the spiritual education of a community; for there the members strive for good only because of the material award, but not just because of the good which alone should decide everything for a person.

72,19. It hardly needs to be mentioned afterwards that finally – apart from the fact that such marriages are held purely in the order of God and their fruit can rejoice in the blessing from above – also for such great nation and its anointed leader the greatest moral and physical advantages must emerge; for if a nation wants to have good servants, it must begin to educate them when they are still in the cradle, otherwise they will become wild and will be a torment for their parents instead of comfort and support in their old age.

72,20. But if the marriages are kept in good order, also children in good order will stem from such marriages, and such orderly children become orderly citizens, and such will then become complete citizens of the Kingdom of God in their hearts; and thus everything is fulfilled that the divine order can ever demand from the people of this Earth! Is this now clear and plausible?”

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