BMAR-197

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Chapter 197

SATAN'S FURY. MARTIN'S FEAR AND JOHN'S SERENITY. CHILDREN OF GOD ARE INDEPENDENT OF SATAN.

197,1. Then Satan notices that the party does not leave as bid by him, he becomes furious deep within, and this state of fury renders also his external appearance most frightening.

197,2. (Noticing this, Martin says to John and his other companions): "Friends, things obviously do not look good with the prodigal son. A terrible secret fury is flashing from his eyes, he is frowning, and the distorted corners of his mouth forebode his intention of taking terrible revenge.

197,3. Haven't you been a bit too harsh with him, brother John? I must admit that notwithstanding the power of the Lord within me, I am getting rather afraid, although I am sure that he cannot harm us in any way. Look at the faces of Uron and Shonel, they are as scared as can be. For the sake of the Lord, how will this end?"

197,4. (Says John): "Things do look most threatening! But you must not be afraid of him. Fear of him is a sort of subordination of our might under his power. That, too, would be a triumph over us on his part, which we must never allow. If we did, his evil polarity would draw us to such an extent that it would be extremely difficult for us to free ourselves from his power.

197,5. He treated you in a most humane way, making you considerable promises. However, he did this not with a view to fulfilling them because of your civility, but only in order to trap you as an inexperienced newcomer to this realm.

197,6. However, I saw through his nice scheme and prevented it, and as a result he is now so furious that he would crush us in his rage if he felt equal to our might. But, knowing only too well how weak and impotent he is compared with us, he has become so terribly furious.

197,7. We must take no notice of it and he will soon show a different face."

197,8. (At this moment, Satan stamps his foot with such a force on the ground that the earth shakes in a wide radius, and then he says threateningly to John): "You wretch! Have you not found enough satisfaction in my misery? If I am nothing and of no value in the infinite creation, destroy me altogether with your might, if you dare! But watch out that with my destruction you do not destroy yourself as well!

197,9. But I can see only too clearly how, for your own sake, you are anxious to preserve me. You are a wretched coward, terribly scared of me because you would not find my work as enjoyable as that of the soft heavens. You are afraid of my triumph over you, and so you tell the others not to fear me.

197,10. "Oh, you simpleton, which fear is worse: vain fear of me or the fear of my triumph over you? Don't you see that such a fear is a greatest triumph for me. Tell me, am I not right?"

197,11. (Says John): "A thousand times, no! There is a vast difference between fear of a behavior through which one might become as absurd as you, and a silly fear of your individual spirit. The first one could be most detrimental to a pure spirit, whilst the latter could not possibly affect a spirit who is strong in the Lord, and it could not harm weaker spirits because they are always surrounded by mighty guardian spirits.

197,12. Therefore, I warned Martin mainly of such a giving-in to your will, the result of which would be your triumph over us, and this could endanger even me. But I did not warn him for fear of you yourself, because you have no power to oppose us, except that of falsehood and persuasiveness.

197,13. That in your stupidity and pride you are of the opinion I must be afraid of you and dare not destroy you for fear that with you I might destroy myself, is one of your mighty errors, Satan. My preservation, as well as that of any of us, is quite as independent of you as is the Lord's, for we now live forever in the Lord, and the Lord through His fatherly love in us.

197,14. In view of this, you will understand that I could destroy you completely without the least harm to my own existence. That I refrain from doing so is not due to my love for you, nor my fear of you, but solely to the Lord's endless love and patience, which also dwell in my heart.

197,15. If it depended on me alone, the whole of infinity would have peace from you, for I, John, would have made an end of you long ago. I assume that you understand my very blunt words!"

197,16. (Says Satan): "Indeed, I do! But, unfortunately, I have again found to my disgust that you, the so-called pure heavenly spirits, have the most impure and unworthy notions and ideas of God!"

197,17. (Says John): "Why so? Tell me. That seems to be quite a novel trap of yours. We would like to hear your argument."

197,18. (Says Satan): "You ask why so. Does that sound peculiar and new to your so-called heavenly pure ears? Wait just a moment and I will give you a light that will keep you wondering forever. But if you want an explanation, be good enough to first answer briefly the question I will now put to you.

197,19. I give you in advance the most sacred assurance that if you are able to accuse me of an untruth, I shall forever submit freely to anything you might demand of me. If not, I stay as I am, and you and your companions may leave here unharmed and unmolested by me so that you can gain in your heavenly homeland a purer and worthier concept of God."

197,20. (Says John): "Well then, ask! But do not come again with your old only-too-familiar questions, for then our discussion will soon have to come to an end."

197,21. (Says Satan): "All right, this will mean to be or not to be. I shall see how far you will get with your wisdom! The question is: 'Is God ubiquitous or not?' "

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