BMAR-49

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Chapter 49

A VIEW OF THE MOON THROUGH THE ELEVENTH DOOR. -BISHOP MARTIN AND THE LUNAR PHILOSOPHER.

49,1. (The Lord): "Behold, we are at the eleventh door. Look in and then tell Me what you see."

49,2. Bishop Martin looks inside for a while, and then says, somewhat sulkingly: "What is this crazy world of nonsense? Humans, slightly bigger than rabbits on earth, and the scenery resembling some nice hotbeds. The trees wouldn't be any taller than blackberry or juniper bushes on earth! At least, the mountains, which are extremely high and steep, are notable. I do not notice any seas, but there are lakes, the largest of which might hold about ten thousand buckets of water. Oh dear, what a difference between door number ten and door number eleven!

49,3. But what is that madcap over there with but one foot? That could only be an animal, not a human being. And now I can see a whole herd of a peculiar type of marmot. Anyway, it is strange that so far I haven't seen any animals. And in this crazy world, there appear to be more animals than human beings. Should this actually be an animal world? Yes, it might be, for there I now see a large flock of a kind of sheep. A pity I do not see any oxen or asses to enjoy the company of my own kind! There are also birds; as long as there aren't any too merry birds among them!

49,4. There, there, ha, ha, isn't that funny? These humans are grown together, the female sitting like a hump on the shoulders of the male. And there a male is inflating himself like a tree-frog, making a noise with his taut belly like a Turkish regimental drummer on earth. This is extremely funny and ridiculous!

49,5. Really, Lord, when creating this little world, You probably did not use too much of Your omnipotence and wisdom, for compared with all that I have previously seen, it is in no way sublime. Now I have to apologize to the earth for speaking so badly of it at door number ten. For, compared with this world, it is a real paradise, except for its mankind. Tell me, o Lord, if You will, what is this world called? It couldn't possibly be within the solar system of our earth."

49,6. (Say I): "Oh yes, it is, for this is the moon of your earth. And the human beings came originally from the earth, as did the moon itself. It used to be the most inferior part of the earth, but is now much better than the entire earth. Therefore, it has now become a schoolhouse for extremely worldly souls. For a meager, small world with a fertile spirit is preferable to a fertile, big world with a very meager spirit.

49,7. Although outwardly these men look miserable enough, you will take quite a while to grow spiritually as fertile as they have already been for a long time.

49,8. But in order to convince you of the wisdom of these men, a couple shall approach you and discuss various matters with you. There is already one of these pick-a-back couples; ask them some questions, and rest assured that they will have an answer to everything. So be it!"

49,9. (Says Bishop Martin): "Oh yes, there is already a couple approaching us together with their whole world, which appears to be used by them like a ship. Looked at closely, they look rather quaint, especially the little female. However, we seem to be invisible to them, as they are looking around expectantly as if they perceived something but could not see it."

49,10. (Say I): "You must draw nearer to them and thus establish contact with their little sphere and then they will become aware of you. The inhabitants of all the moons of the planets have the characteristic that they can see spirits from other planets only when they are inside their little spheres. This is due to the fact that the moons are the lowest and most materialistic level of the planets, just as the dirt of animals is their lowest and most materialistic level, but often more useful than beast or man themselves. Now do as I told you, and the couple will be able to see you!"

49,11. Bishop Martin obeys, and the couple sees him, admiring his height. But Martin immediately starts the following conversation with them: "Are you the real inhabitants of this little world, or are there still others, taller than you and maybe also wiser?"

49,12. (Say the two): "There is only a certain number of humans like us. But there are many other creatures here, and on the opposite side of this world there are penitents who frequently come to this side, in order to learn the inner wisdom from us. These penitents usually come from another world, probably from the one you come from. They are tall of stature, but their spirituality is very small. You, too, are of a tall build, but the human substance in you is still scarcely visible.

49,13. And what are you doing, you big men, who have been given so much life? Why do you take so little care of it? When it is time to sow and reap for his temporal life, man toils diligently overcoming all obstacles. He endures heat and cold, rain and storms. He does not spare his physical body and often risks his life to gain a pitiful livelihood. But he does little or nothing to preserve and perfect the true inner life for his real, eternal, divine, great self.

49,14. What would you think of a gardener who planted fruit trees and as soon as they started to blossom and sprout, he took these first sprouts for the actual fruit, tore all the blossoms and new shoots off the trees and decorated his house with them? Such a gardener would obviously be a great fool, for while his neighbor gathered fruit from his trees, he might have to starve since there would not be any fruit on his own trees.

49,15. But is not any man an even greater fool if he enjoys already as fruit his temporal life, which is nothing else but blossoms and leaves for the inner, true life? Through this unnatural and immature enjoyment, he only ruins the actual fruit to come, the true, eternal life of the spirit. And only from the inner seed of the ripened fruit can the new, everlasting life develop, but not from the blossoms or the leaves!

49,16. Thus it is with every man: his body, his senses, and his reason are the blossoms and leaves. From these a mature soul evolves and the proper maturity of the soul will hold a ripe seed. And this seed is the immortal spirit which, when fully matured, will permeate everything with its own immortality, just as perishable flesh, anointed with decay-resisting etheric oils, will also become imperishable.

49,17. Behold, you big man, this is our wisdom! To achieve this, we follow the recognized order of the supreme Spirit of God, and this makes us fully what we are. You may now argue with me, if you can! I am prepared to put up with anything from you.

49,18. Our bishop is rather disconcerted and amazed at the enormous wisdom of the moon-couple. After quite a while, he says: "I never expected you moon people to possess such profound wisdom! Who taught you such wisdom, which could not possibly have originated in you?

49,19. Animals and plants know their natural order by instinct. It is put into them and they must follow it under compulsion. However, man, as a free being, must gain this knowledge through outside instruction, receiving it like an empty vessel. And the Word of God's wisdom must be placed in his heart like a grain of seed into the earth, to enable him to know himself and, consequently, God and His order. If man does not get any instruction at all, he stays more ignorant than an animal and more stupid than a stone.

49,20. Since you are obviously men with the same divine rights as we are, you must at some time have been taught by God Himself, either directly or indirectly. Otherwise your wisdom would be the greatest wonder I have so far encountered. God must have been the first teacher with all primeval men, or all men would be far below animal level in their intelligence. Where A was blind, who could have given light to B? And if thus, also B had been blind, who could have enlightened C? Since you are a very enlightened man, do tell me, please, how and when the obviously divine light came to you?"

Main Page Book Bishop Martin BMAR-49 Chapter