BMAR-107

From Search Jesus-Comes
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Main Page Book Bishop Martin BMAR-107 Chapter


Chapter 107

THE LORD'S ADVICE TO THE INQUISITIVE NEW CITIZEN OF HEAVEN. THE PARABLE OF THE TIED UP BAG. MARTIN IS REASSURED.

107,1. As I return to Chanchah from her countrymen, she complains to Me about Bishop Martin's attitude and that she now did not know what to think of him.

107,2. (Say I to her): "Listen, My dear Chanchah, you are really setting about My brother without thinking that he might have confidential instructions which could tie his tongue for your own good. Therefore, you should in future treat him, who is one of my noblest friends, with more consideration so as not to embarrass him and grieve his heart.

107,3. Concerning your first six questions, I assure you there is nothing in this friend and brother to justify your suspicions. It is for a very wise reason that he gets embarrassed every time you want to discuss Me with him. However, you would never guess the reason for his embarrassment. Since the true reason of his embarrassment is not at the bottom of your questions, he cannot answer them.

107,4. As regards your last three questions, he cannot answer them either, because you have not challenged the actual reason for his em- barrassment at your first three questions, and could not challenge it not knowing the reason yourself. Whatever answer he could have given, be it in the affirmative or negative, it would have been an untruth. This, however, can never be here in the kingdom of heaven; even if someone wanted to speak an untruth, he would be unable to. Therefore, friend Martin, who loves you very much, remained silent and would rather bear your contempt than lie to you, his beloved Chanchah. Was not that most commendable of him?"

107,5. (Says Chanchah, also somewhat embarrassed): "Oh, glorious friend, if that be the case with our host, I am extremely sorry to have been the cause for, no doubt, hurting him deeply. I do wish I could make up for it.

107,6. Yes, I am really sorry for this. But then, it might not be all my fault because as you, my glorious, mighty friend, are aware, I am a stranger here and do not know as yet what and how one may ask in this world. But since you have now given me an idea as to how to act, I shall adhere to it in future. Just tell me one thing: Why is it not possible here to obtain an answer at all to an awkward and ill-advised question?"

107,7. (Say I): "That is quite simple, my dearest Chanchah. Let us assume you gave me a firmly tied up bag with the request to open it up and give you out of it a thousand beautiful gems. I would ask you whether you knew for sure that these gems were inside, but you would say no, you were not sure that they were inside, but you suspected that they were.

107,8. If I, however, were positive that the bag did not contain the gems, but only hardened dirt, and still opened the bag and handed you the dirt instead of the gems, what would you think of Me if you found out afterwards that I had been quite aware of the bag's contents and only wanted to make you ashamed of your ignorance? Would you not reproach Me for opening the bag knowing what it contained, before telling you the truth about it?

107,9. The same applies here to a doubtful question. It is like a bag firmly tied, which Martin is expected to untie and hand from it what you demand. If it does not contain what you would like it to, tell Me, what is Martin supposed to do? Should he shame the one he loves so much? What do you think, sweet Chanchah?"

107,10. (Says Chanchah): "Ah, yes, my glorious friend, when you speak, everything appears so very clear, and I fully understand the truth of your words. But this is not so when friend Martin speaks. The more he says, the less I understand what he means, and this forces me to try and penetrate deeper and ask more questions to which, however, he has not given me a single definite answer.

107,11. Had he just answered one question definitely, I would not have gone on asking. Or he could at least have shown me, as you have just done, how one has to put questions here to obtain answers, whether one has to ask questions at all, or whether one may not ask questions altogether. Since I was not enlightened on this point, you and Martin must excuse me for having gone too far with my questions, which to our good friend Martin must have been a proper nuisance.

107,12. Oh, friend, what a peculiar place this is! Wherever you look, there are wonders upon wonders, never suspected on earth. Who, upon seeing such incomprehensible manifestations, would not ask for an explanation from those who are more experienced? Who works all these wonders? If this is heaven, where is Lama Who originated it? Tell me, most beloved friend, are not such questions natural and excusable under such circumstances? "

Main Page Book Bishop Martin BMAR-107 Chapter