BMAR-26

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Main Page Book Bishop Martin BMAR-26 Chapter


Chapter 26

BISHOP MARTIN'S MODESTY AND MEEKNESS. THE BLESSED LOVE-FEAST AT THE LORD'S TABLE.

26,1. We now sit down at the table and Peter brings the wine and a toga (old Roman outer garment) for Bishop Martin, and says: "There, brother, since you gave your coat and vest to the poor, put on this somewhat better garment for the meal."

26,2. Bishop Martin looks at the beautiful light-blue robe with deep red trimming, and says: "Ah, but this is much too beautiful for the likes of me! How can you suggest that I, a poor sinner, should wear a robe similar to the one our Savior Jesus, the worthiest of all men, used to wear on earth? That would be a mockery!

26,3. No, I shall not do that! Although Jesus was not exactly the God ignorant people like to make Him, He was still the wisest and best of men that ever walked on earth, the perfect man without sin, deserving the highest goodwill of the Lord; whereas I am and was a great sinner. Therefore, I cannot wear this robe!

26,4. I would rather not eat a morsel of bread, nor have a drop of wine, than put on this Jesus-robe in the truest sense, being as unworthy as I am. Give me any rag suitable for me! It is quite enough that in the world I wore the robes of Melchisedec, which folly caused me enough suffering here; for the future, I hope to be wiser with the help of God!"

26,5. (Say I): "As you wish! There is absolutely no coercion here. Have your meal without a coat. So be it!"

26,6. (Bishop Martin): "I am glad about that - no luxury for me! But now, dear brothers, I do have a request. Although I am quite hungry and thirsty by now, I am sure our poor proteges are much worse off. Therefore, do grant me permission to give them my share and let me take it to them personally. The joy of having fed these poor ones shall be the main satisfaction of my heart!"

26,7. (Say I): "Dearest brother, this wish from your heart makes Me very happy! However, this time your wish is sufficient, as your proteges have been well provided for. Therefore, come and sit down with Me and eat and drink to your heart's content. After the meal, we shall go and visit them and see whether we find some suitable occupation for them. So be it!"

26,8. (Peter speaks): "Lord and Master, do administer the bread and wine, for it tastes so much better when You do it, than if I help myself. Please do this for us, dearest Lord and Master!"

26,9. (Say I): "Yes, my dear brother, it will be My pleasure, if only our dear friend and brother here does not mind."

26,10. (Bishop Martin): "Not at all, dear friends. I do know the sect of the so-called bread-breakers; you probably belonged to it on earth. This, of course, does not make any difference in the spirit- world, but if somebody enjoys such human pious memories, let him do it. But I have had my fill of ceremonies in the world, so that I can do very well without them here.

26,11. Therefore, I do not care whether you break or cut or saw up the bread, as long as there is something to chew when it is needed! But I quite agree that the master of the house should distribute the bread to his servants; you feel more free and easy eating bread that has been handed to you, than if you had helped yourself."

26,12. (Say I): "Quite right! So, since you do not mind, I shall break the bread, bless it, and give it to you!"

26,13. I now break the bread, bless it, and give it to them.

26,14. Peter is close to tears with joy, but Bishop Martin puts his arm around him and says: "What a dear, good soul you are! The breaking of bread must have reminded you of the scene with the two disciples on their way to Emmaus, which might have been real, but most likely was a pious invention. I must admit, I was often moved to tears by it myself.

26,15. For this scene is not only of deep significance, it also makes you wish it had really taken place. Weak and short-sighted men just love to hear and dream of miracles, especially in ancient times, when God Himself played a part, unrecognized by the people involved. A miracle like that happening during their own lifetime would seem much more incredible.

26,16. Dearest master and friend, do break the bread any time, as I, too, like this pious custom!

26,17. What wonderfully-tasting bread! And the wine - I have never tasted better wine on earth, I'm sure! Is this wine, maybe, also of a spiritual nature? Although it doesn't really matter where it has come from as long as it tastes good. God be praised in eternity for this delicious meal! Now I can tackle the next job even if it is hard work."

26,18. (Say I): "I am glad that you both have enjoyed this meal. May it be blessed for you! But let us now go and see how our poor are getting on."

Main Page Book Bishop Martin BMAR-26 Chapter