SSUN2-34

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Chapter 34

First floor - details of the Palace of the Sun and its correspondence

34,1. Look, there we are already in the gallery of the first floor. Again you see the pillar-circles instead of the large pillars, and in the center of this pillar-circle, you can see altars, similar to the altar we first encountered on our journey through the avenues. As you can see, the inner circle of the pillar-circle is, all around equipped with an inexpressibly magnificent staircase.

34,2. But what are the altars in the center of these pillar-circles? On the one hand they serve as ornamentation in the circle; on the other hand, they signify the first degree of the knowledge of God, while the pillar-circles on ground-level are completely empty, depicting the human in the completely natural state.

34,3. But see the splendor of these pillars; they are no longer smooth, but sinuous. In the hollow of the swirl is ornamentation of the most beautiful foliage, and the belly of the swirl is occupied with the most marvelous, self-luminous precious hemisphere shaped stones. The color of the columns itself is bluish-green, the foliage is like flaming gold, the floor of the circle is like strongly sparkling ruby, and the staircase here is made of white flaming silver.

34,4. But see the floor of the gallery. It is made from the finest hyacinth, the splendid balustrade outward from porphyry, and the inner wall of the main building is of onyx, which is a splendid gem. The arcuate vault between the columns and the continuous wall are of the most beautiful opal, in which all kinds of colored, self-luminous stones are placed in wonderful order.

34,5. Then there is a high and broad gate between the pillars of the main building. This gate, as you may notice, has two wings, which are attached to a quadrangular column placed in the middle of the gate, and open not in the middle, but on both sides. The square column is a blazing piece of diamond, and the gate-wings are of flaming gold, which is still more glorious than the transparent; This, of course, is not to be found on the earth.

34,6. A transparent gold could be produced on the earth; but how? Through glazing; for you know that all metals, when they have reached the highest degree of heat, kind of incinerates at this degree of heat. After burning, however, nothing but a kind of slag remains. When this slag is crushed again, and mixed with a salt solution, it becomes viscous, and when it is cooled, which became liquid by means of the salt, and naturally, by means of great heat. If, therefore, one would produce by this method glass from the gold slag,which is very costly on the earth, in the manner described above, it would yield the finest transparent gold glass of yellow-reddish color.

34,7. But to portray a blazing gold on earth would probably be the purest impossibility. Not even on the planetary suns, but on the central suns alone, where the light is at of the most immeasurable intensity. There, every transparent body is capable of continuous flaming, because it can never consume the light absorbed in itself, according to the light which surrounds it. And thus, by such a constant conflict between light and light, such a flame occurs, which appears as if matter were in a constant burning state. If, however, one would touch such matter, it is perfectly solid, and not warm in the least, but just the opposite: the more intense the flaming, the cooler it is.

34,8. Here is then a very close correspondence with the people on your earth, who are very fiery on the outside, and most zealous; but if their hearts are touched, one is astonished at their coldness. This is how you can have people who can state the case for the poor with fiery zeal; but when they would meet a poor man in secret, they are colder than the thousand-year-old ice of a glacier, which cannot be melted by an ordinary sunbeam, except however for here and there in small portions, a well-nourished flash.

34,9. The same goes for most of the famous pulpit preachers. They ignite hell with their excessive fire, in which none of the most fire-related beings could exist for one second; if you afterward would ask him what his heart says about such an exceedingly high hellish degree of heat, the answer will be: I am quite happy. A good roast and a not too small glass of wine after such a hot sermon brings everything in him back into balance.

34,10. This would be a correspondence for our flaming gold; but this is not the recommendable. However, there is also an acceptable value, namely a spiritually good one, and this is the following:

34,11. The love of the Lords works powerfully in those people who are full of love in their hearts. This causes a conflict between love and love; and this love then acts charitable to the outside. It enlightens and warms whatever surrounds it; but it remains cool in itself. Why then? Because it is not self-love. This is also shown by the flaming gold. Now we know this correspondence; and so we can take a closer look at the doors.

34,12. Then look only at what sublimities have been plastically incorporated into these gates! Does not the matter almost look like a picture-book, which is laid in with the most wonderful colors from the middle of the mass of which the wings are made? Then you can see through the smooth surface of the gate wing into the interior of the building! You are stepping back; what have you seen? I read it on your faces; you have discovered people, and that of never-before-seen beauty! ? Yes, yes, so it is.

34,13. We must not approach these people yet, we must become accustomed first by the ever-increasing splendor of this building, otherwise we could suffer some damage to our spiritual health. For a spirit of the highest heaven is never so perfect as to be able to look at all the beauty of the Lord's creation without the danger of a temporal injury.

34,14. In order to not become too much enchanted here, let us proceed very quickly into such a pillar circle, and up the staircase to the second floor, or to the number of the gallery, the third. There we shall encounter something different.

34,15. I note a point of doubt in you, and this consists of a incomprehensible numerical discrepancy, namely that we all saw from a distance this whole main building to consist of twelve floors, but in close proximity, only ten. Let the be good for now; only when we are on the tenth floor, the matter will be enlightened for you. For now, however, we are only going to our second floor, or the third gallery.


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