SSUN2-55

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Main Page The Spiritual Sun SSUN2-55 Chapter


Chapter 55

Description of the highest level

55,1. We are on the spot; what do you say to this scene? Has the eye of a man living on the earth, I mean, the eye of his soul, ever fathomed something similar in his deepest imagination? Look, the extraordinarily large round place on which we find ourselves is bright-green, and this radiance is not a surging, but a calmray. With what could this surface be compared? For example, with an extremely well-polished emerald? What a meager comparison would that be. Should we compare the surface with the very finest silky velvet, which shimmers as if the threads it is made of are like green gold? I say this comparison is dull and does not do justice here. Yes, with earthly comparisons we will not be able to get anywhere. We shall therefore have to aim a little higher; we will stretch our hands far out into the endless space and meet on the same individual planetary sun which illuminate the surrounding world bodies with such a green light. Yes, it must be a sun, and this must have been placed here as a flat disk; then the comparison would be correct.

55,2. So that would be the ground on which we now stand; it is like a mighty radiant etheric surface of a sun, and yet it is solid as a diamond. What do you say about this endless splendor? You are silent and cannot bring forth a single word. Yes, my dear friends and brothers, this is also perfectly understandable; for where it becomes difficult for us light-emanating spirits of heaven to speak, it will surely be so much harder for you, since you have never seen anything of such immeasurable exalted fulness of light in your beings.

55,3. Let us leave this; we have looked at the surface, now we turn our gaze to the inexpressibly splendid surroundings of this great vacant place. Behold, a single white railing encompasses this whole great free place. At every ten klafter, a hundred klafter high obelisk rises from the railing. Their color is also a dazzling white; on top of every obelisk are fairly big radiating balls of alternating colors: first red, then green, then blue, then violet, then yellow, and many color nuances in between. It seems as if every such obelisk, of which there are hundreds on this vast, free plateau, carries a really great sun, mightily illuminating this open space.

55,4. One could say here, of course, why so many luminous bodies on such a central sun? It would be more pleasant for the eye to diminish the light rather than to amplify it. I tell you, that is precisely what is taken care of with the installation of such powerful luminous bodies. This, you say, is not easy to understand. But I tell you that this can be understood very naturally and easily. Why then and how? For this, my dear friends, there are already a lot of quite palpable examples on the earth, taken naturally and spiritually.

55,5. See, in the summertime, all the vegetation of white color emerge, and though it is apparently white, as is the snow of winter, I can assure you that you can impossibly get out into the open at any time during the day in the very strong power of light, lest you be completely melted and dissolved; for the rays of the sun fall too intensely upon the surface of that part of the earth which you inhabit at summertime. In winter, however, the white color is of good effect; for without this, the light would have little effect; and in time the cold would increase so much that it would be impossible for her to hold out in the open air. But the white color of the snow throws back the light and subsequently heats the air.

55,6. In summertime, however, the vegetation must cover the surface of the earth in a variety of colors; by this wise design, the intensive rays of the sun is most effectively consumed, and only the gentle part of it reflects back from the multi-colored surface of the earth. You could also attempt a similar phenomenon artificially on a small scale, and for this, I will give you the following.

55,7. At night, place a strong argand lamp on the center of a table. When you look at them individually, their light will offend your eye; but if you take several lamps, place them around the white flame, and put stained glass cylinders over her white flames. This will give you a light of all sorts of colors, that is each of these surrounding lamps will radiate a differently colored light. But what will be the effect? The effect will be that you will be able to look at the light of the middle white lamp with great ease, and it will seem to you as if it has made your room at least ten times darker than when only lit with one white lamp. The truth of this is evident every day in the whole of nature, as well as the experience you have drawn from what I have explained to you.

55,8. This needs to be spiritually correct too; why then? Because it must be present in the spirit first and then in natural analysis. If, however, it is spiritually correct, the proof is also indisputably given for its natural correctness. Will such evidence of spiritual correctness be difficult to deliver? Oh no! You already have a very good proverb for this, which in this case explains our subject in the best way; and this proverb is: Ex omnibus allquid et toto nihil. - A person who wants to be versed in all subjects of human knowledge, surely has many colorful light rays in the chamber of his soul. If, however, all these rays are combined, they will scarcely have so much strength as to illuminate a room at night as would a glow-worm, and in the spirit, such an effect will be expressed most clearly; for such highly educated men are neither in detail, nor generally proficient, in order to give one or the other opinion regarding a situation, which satisfies all requirements.

55,9. I think this is so clear that we need not say one word about it anymore, and so we can turn back to our beautiful open space, and we can see the purpose of light-alterations. With this we would have adequately looked at the ground of this place and its surrounds.

55,10. Now, however, look into the middle of this great open space; there stands a mighty great pillar-circle, which is covered with a dark red radiant crown. Thirty pillars bear this crown; they are all spaced two klafter apart. In the center of this circle, you will discover a crimson altar on which our well-known cross-timber is placed. We shall go to it at once, and then we shall very well know what is to be done on this magnificent open space. At the same time, however, I also draw your attention to the fact that this mighty pillar-circle, whose pillars are of a pale blue color, forms the twelfth floor of this building, which you have missed, but seen from a distance. Since we now will work with this decorum, we shall go to the circle at once, and wait for what is still to be seen. - And so we go.


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